Nebraska Feminist Network

An organization aimed at bringing together feminists from across the state of Nebraska so that they may meet with other like-minded feminists and help to support feminist causes in Nebraska communities.

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socialismartnature:

(Photoset) Celebrating International Women’s Day

(via feministsbakecupcakestoo)

fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

Nancy Morejón is the best known and most widely translated woman poet of post-revolutionary Cuba. Born in 1944 in Havana to a militant dock worker and a trade-unionist seamstress, Morejón was the first Afro-Cuban to graduate from the University of Havana, where she majored in French, and the first Black woman poet to publish widely and be accepted as a professional writer, critic, and translator. Morejón is recipient of the Critic’s Prize (1986) and Cuba’s National Prize for Literature (2001).  Currently, she directs the Caribbean Studies Center at Casa de las Américas, Havana, epicenter of Cuban and Latin American intelligentsia.
Morejón’s work addresses contemporary issues of ethnicity, gender, history, politics, and Afro-Cuban identity. Her poems stand as vibrant reflections on the intermingling of Spanish and African cultures in Cuba, what it means to be a child of both traditions, and how the bright threads of this heritage are part of the greater web of the African experience in the Americas.
Like her mentor the legendary poet Nicolás Guillén, Morejón celebrates blackness but refuses to inscribe identity or struggle within the parameters of any single factor. “I am, at once, Nancy Morejon,” she says, “an individual, a unity, who cannot be subdivided into parts as one does when learning math…I am not more of a black person than a woman; I am not more of a woman than a Cuban; I am not more of a black person than a Cuban. I am a brief combustion of those factors.” (text and image via The Poetry Center at Smith College)

fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

Nancy Morejón is the best known and most widely translated woman poet of post-revolutionary Cuba. Born in 1944 in Havana to a militant dock worker and a trade-unionist seamstress, Morejón was the first Afro-Cuban to graduate from the University of Havana, where she majored in French, and the first Black woman poet to publish widely and be accepted as a professional writer, critic, and translator. Morejón is recipient of the Critic’s Prize (1986) and Cuba’s National Prize for Literature (2001).  Currently, she directs the Caribbean Studies Center at Casa de las Américas, Havana, epicenter of Cuban and Latin American intelligentsia.

Morejón’s work addresses contemporary issues of ethnicity, gender, history, politics, and Afro-Cuban identity. Her poems stand as vibrant reflections on the intermingling of Spanish and African cultures in Cuba, what it means to be a child of both traditions, and how the bright threads of this heritage are part of the greater web of the African experience in the Americas.

Like her mentor the legendary poet Nicolás Guillén, Morejón celebrates blackness but refuses to inscribe identity or struggle within the parameters of any single factor. “I am, at once, Nancy Morejon,” she says, “an individual, a unity, who cannot be subdivided into parts as one does when learning math…I am not more of a black person than a woman; I am not more of a woman than a Cuban; I am not more of a black person than a Cuban. I am a brief combustion of those factors.” (text and image via The Poetry Center at Smith College)

(via lavendersprigsandcoffee)

mohandasgandhi:

dank-potion:

23andchildfree:

Happy women’s day, yo

What’s misandry, again?

Women perform 66% of the world’s work, but receive only 11% of the world’s income, and own only 1% of the world’s land.
Women make up 66% of the world’s illiterate adults.
Women head 83% of single-parent families. The number of families nurtured by women alone doubled from 1970 to 1995 (from 5.6 million to 12.2 million).
Women account for 55% of all college students, but even when women have equal years of education it does not translate into economic opportunities or political power.
There are six million more women than men in the world.
Two-thirds of the world’s children who receive less than four years of education are girls. Girls represent nearly 60% of the children not in school.
Parents in countries such as China and India sometimes use sex determination tests to find out if their fetus is a girl. Of 8,000 fetuses aborted at a Bombay clinic, 7,999 were female.
Wars today affect civilians most, since they are civil wars, guerrilla actions and ethnic disputes over territory or government. 3 out of 4 fatalities of war are women and children.
Rape is consciously used as a tool of genocide and weapon of war. Tens of thousands of women and girls have been subjected to rape and other sexual violence since the crisis erupted in Darfur in 2003. There is no evidence of anyone being convicted in Darfur for these atrocities.
About 75% of the refugees and internally displaced in the world are women who have lost their families and their homes.
Gender-based violence kills one in three women across the world and is the biggest cause of injury and death to women worldwide, causing more deaths and disability among women aged 15 to 44 than cancer, malaria, traffic accident, and war.
[source]

mohandasgandhi:

dank-potion:

23andchildfree:

Happy women’s day, yo

What’s misandry, again?

  • Women perform 66% of the world’s work, but receive only 11% of the world’s income, and own only 1% of the world’s land.
  • Women make up 66% of the world’s illiterate adults.
  • Women head 83% of single-parent families. The number of families nurtured by women alone doubled from 1970 to 1995 (from 5.6 million to 12.2 million).
  • Women account for 55% of all college students, but even when women have equal years of education it does not translate into economic opportunities or political power.
  • There are six million more women than men in the world.
  • Two-thirds of the world’s children who receive less than four years of education are girls. Girls represent nearly 60% of the children not in school.
  • Parents in countries such as China and India sometimes use sex determination tests to find out if their fetus is a girl. Of 8,000 fetuses aborted at a Bombay clinic, 7,999 were female.
  • Wars today affect civilians most, since they are civil wars, guerrilla actions and ethnic disputes over territory or government. 3 out of 4 fatalities of war are women and children.
  • Rape is consciously used as a tool of genocide and weapon of war. Tens of thousands of women and girls have been subjected to rape and other sexual violence since the crisis erupted in Darfur in 2003. There is no evidence of anyone being convicted in Darfur for these atrocities.
  • About 75% of the refugees and internally displaced in the world are women who have lost their families and their homes.
  • Gender-based violence kills one in three women across the world and is the biggest cause of injury and death to women worldwide, causing more deaths and disability among women aged 15 to 44 than cancer, malaria, traffic accident, and war.

[source]

(Source: stfuconservatives, via kingmycroftholmes)

emmanuelnegro:

Ciao, lavoro in una scuola dove funziona cosí:
- Oh, EmmanuelNegro, dovresti fare un poster per la festa della donna, da appendere in giro per la scuola.
- Ok, da zero a cento quanto compagno lo volete?
- Duecento turbo a manetta comeunpazzoafarispentinellanotte.
- Nuncépprobblema.
(per i non lusofoni: il testo dice “Ricordare le conquiste di ieri - Lottare per le conquiste di domani”)

emmanuelnegro:

Ciao, lavoro in una scuola dove funziona cosí:

- Oh, EmmanuelNegro, dovresti fare un poster per la festa della donna, da appendere in giro per la scuola.

- Ok, da zero a cento quanto compagno lo volete?

- Duecento turbo a manetta comeunpazzoafarispentinellanotte.

- Nuncépprobblema.

(per i non lusofoni: il testo dice “Ricordare le conquiste di ieri - Lottare per le conquiste di domani”)

(via pintu)

liquornspice:


Debra White Plume: “If you don’t see the importance of the Lakotas & the Idahoans forming human roadblocks against Tar Sands contracted trucks in this nation’s heartland, know that those people are putting their lives on the line for this nation’s water & food security. With all the folks freaking out over foreign terrorists poisoning our food & water supplies in this country, the real threat to our nation’s homeland security is a threat to the water supplies of this nation’s heartland, which produces the bulk of the food you eat throughout the year.”
March 8 - Happy International Women’s Day to all of our sisters in struggle!

Hell yes.

liquornspice:

Debra White Plume: “If you don’t see the importance of the Lakotas & the Idahoans forming human roadblocks against Tar Sands contracted trucks in this nation’s heartland, know that those people are putting their lives on the line for this nation’s water & food security. With all the folks freaking out over foreign terrorists poisoning our food & water supplies in this country, the real threat to our nation’s homeland security is a threat to the water supplies of this nation’s heartland, which produces the bulk of the food you eat throughout the year.”

March 8 - Happy International Women’s Day to all of our sisters in struggle!

Hell yes.

(Source: fuckyeahmarxismleninism, via blackraincloud)

keepyourboehneroutofmyuterus:

rhrealitycheck:

Google doodle celebrates International Women’s Day 2012 :)
We’ve got some great writing up at RH Reality Check in celebration, too.
And we’re tweeting at #IWD2012.

I want to say “Happy International Women’s Day” to everyone who identifies as a woman. 
I like the doodle, though Amadi breaks down Google’s love of gendered (and classed and raced) doodles and makes me question why I like this doodle and why Google feels the need to represent women as flowers.
And I’d like to quote Melissa McEwan:

I’m angry about the state of the world for the women in it, in the US, along the US border, in Egypt, inDR Congo, in Brazil, in Scotland, in Australia, women in every country all over the world, black women, brown women, white women, tall women, short women, dwarf women, fat women, thin women, in-betweenie women, trans* women, women with disabilities, able-bodied women, neuro-typical women, neuro-atypical women, old women, young women, girls, women with children, childfree women, healthy women, ill women, poor women, rich women, middle class women, employed women, unemployed women, insured women, uninsured women, immigrant women, migrant women, English-speaking women, non-English-speaking women, progressive women, conservative women, women in unions, women in uniforms, women in male-centric careers, women in comas, straight women, lesbian women, bisexual women, asexual women, demisexual women, partnered women, unpartnered women, poly women, powerful women, weak women, vegan woman, vegetarian women, omnivorous women, religious women, atheist women, agnostic women, educated women, uneducated women, women who have survived trauma, women who want my advocacy, women who don’t, and/or every other conceivable expression, intersectionality, and experience of womanhood that exists on the planet.I am angry at what we are denied on the basis of our womanhood, or the insufficiency of our womanhood, or the unacceptable expression of our womanhood, as arbitrarily defined by people fiercely guarding their privilege.I am angry that we are denied autonomy, dignity, respect, the right of consent, safety, security, opportunity, access, equality—and many things smaller than those.

And finally, I’m going to quote Flavia Dzodan’s tweets today (she’s on Tumblr here):

On International Women’s Day, I’d like to question who gets to define “woman” as a paradigm (cis, White, able bodied, etc.). And I’d like to reflect on how media will offer a normalized gaze over women to actually continue perpetuating the normalized “woman”. My word of the day on IWD: exclusion. Which women are excluded from this universal? Who do we celebrate & which paradigms do we re-enforce?
How do we empower women on International Women’s Day? By challenging the narrow minded and binarist definition of “woman”.
Also, International Women’s Day was established by an assembly of socialist women workers to create awareness of working class struggles. Media “celebrates” International Women’s Day by obscuring working class issues and instigating more middle class values as desirable. 
Trans women are targeted for systematic violence, what do we “celebrate” on International Women’s Day? Who gets to claim “woman” as category?
We, as women, should be acutely aware of how intragender violence works and who we deny a place on the International Women’s Day table.
How do we support policies that oppress immigrant women? How do we enforce racist paradigms of definitions of “woman” and beauty.
As feminist women, we fight against patriarchy while we obscure our participation in kyriarchy. Now THAT is my IWD’s challenge.
When undocumented immigrant women are abused in internment camps while waiting for deportation and we remain silent, we become complicit.
I should adapt my personal motto for the day “MY INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY WILL BE INTERSECTIONAL OR IT WILL BE BULLSHIT”.
And because this bears repeating: Racism is also gender violence.
On IWD, I don’t want equality in a hetero-cis-normative, racist system. I don’t want a “career” in it. I want to do away altogether.

keepyourboehneroutofmyuterus:

rhrealitycheck:

Google doodle celebrates International Women’s Day 2012 :)

We’ve got some great writing up at RH Reality Check in celebration, too.

And we’re tweeting at #IWD2012.

I want to say “Happy International Women’s Day” to everyone who identifies as a woman. 

I like the doodle, though Amadi breaks down Google’s love of gendered (and classed and raced) doodles and makes me question why I like this doodle and why Google feels the need to represent women as flowers.

And I’d like to quote Melissa McEwan:

I’m angry about the state of the world for the women in it, in the US, along the US border, in Egypt, inDR Congo, in Brazil, in Scotland, in Australia, women in every country all over the world, black women, brown women, white women, tall women, short women, dwarf women, fat women, thin women, in-betweenie women, trans* women, women with disabilities, able-bodied women, neuro-typical women, neuro-atypical women, old women, young women, girls, women with children, childfree women, healthy women, ill women, poor women, rich women, middle class women, employed women, unemployed women, insured women, uninsured women, immigrant women, migrant women, English-speaking women, non-English-speaking women, progressive women, conservative women, women in unions, women in uniforms, women in male-centric careers, women in comas, straight women, lesbian women, bisexual women, asexual women, demisexual women, partnered women, unpartnered women, poly women, powerful women, weak women, vegan woman, vegetarian women, omnivorous women, religious women, atheist women, agnostic women, educated women, uneducated women, women who have survived trauma, women who want my advocacy, women who don’t, and/or every other conceivable expression, intersectionality, and experience of womanhood that exists on the planet.

I am angry at what we are denied on the basis of our womanhood, or the insufficiency of our womanhood, or the unacceptable expression of our womanhood, as arbitrarily defined by people fiercely guarding their privilege.

I am angry that we are denied autonomy, dignity, respect, the right of consent, safety, security, opportunity, access, equality—and many things smaller than those.

And finally, I’m going to quote Flavia Dzodan’s tweets today (she’s on Tumblr here):

On International Women’s Day, I’d like to question who gets to define “woman” as a paradigm (cis, White, able bodied, etc.). And I’d like to reflect on how media will offer a normalized gaze over women to actually continue perpetuating the normalized “woman”. My word of the day on IWD: exclusion. Which women are excluded from this universal? Who do we celebrate & which paradigms do we re-enforce?

How do we empower women on International Women’s Day? By challenging the narrow minded and binarist definition of “woman”.

Also, International Women’s Day was established by an assembly of socialist women workers to create awareness of working class struggles. Media “celebrates” International Women’s Day by obscuring working class issues and instigating more middle class values as desirable. 

Trans women are targeted for systematic violence, what do we “celebrate” on International Women’s Day? Who gets to claim “woman” as category?

We, as women, should be acutely aware of how intragender violence works and who we deny a place on the International Women’s Day table.

How do we support policies that oppress immigrant women? How do we enforce racist paradigms of definitions of “woman” and beauty.

As feminist women, we fight against patriarchy while we obscure our participation in kyriarchy. Now THAT is my IWD’s challenge.

When undocumented immigrant women are abused in internment camps while waiting for deportation and we remain silent, we become complicit.

I should adapt my personal motto for the day “MY INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY WILL BE INTERSECTIONAL OR IT WILL BE BULLSHIT”.

And because this bears repeating: Racism is also gender violence.

On IWD, I don’t want equality in a hetero-cis-normative, racist system. I don’t want a “career” in it. I want to do away altogether.

(via keepyourbsoutofmyuterus)

lunaticrayon:

Happy International Women’s Day!

lunaticrayon:

Happy International Women’s Day!

insaniyat:

International Women’s Day: Women in Politics 2012 map (full screen)

There are currently 17 countries with women as head of government, head of state or both, which according to Inter-Parliamentary Union and UN Women has more than doubled since 2005.
[However] The report marks slow advances in the political landscape - the number of lower houses hosting more than 30% women rose slightly from 25 to 30 in 2011 - and although the results show progress IPU Secretary General, Anders B. Johnsson says:
“Less than one-in-five parliamentarians in the world today are women. It is a worrying statistic at this point of human development and impossible to justify. The political will to change this is simply lacking in most cases.”

insaniyat:

International Women’s Day: Women in Politics 2012 map (full screen)

There are currently 17 countries with women as head of government, head of state or both, which according to Inter-Parliamentary Union and UN Women has more than doubled since 2005.

[However] The report marks slow advances in the political landscape - the number of lower houses hosting more than 30% women rose slightly from 25 to 30 in 2011 - and although the results show progress IPU Secretary General, Anders B. Johnsson says:

“Less than one-in-five parliamentarians in the world today are women. It is a worrying statistic at this point of human development and impossible to justify. The political will to change this is simply lacking in most cases.”

(via newwavefeminism)

Happy International Women’s Day!

We queued up some fun/informative/interesting posts related to International Women’s Day, so enjoy!

Omaha’s Equal Employment Ordinance

Next Tuesday March 13th will be the day that the Omaha City Council votes on the Equal Employment Ordinance. In short, the ordinance protects Omahans from workplace discrimination based upon sexual preference or gender identity and expression.

Here are some resources to help you understand just what’s at stake next Tuesday and what you can do to help:

  • http://www.equalomaha.org/ Equal Omaha will provide you with access to contact information for your city council representatives, and information on what else you can do to support the EEO
  • Sign the Change.org petition so we can illustrate to the City Council that Omahans support this ordinance
  • Here’s a sweet FAQ sheet written by Equal Omaha about what the ordinance covers.
  • Here’s an OpEd piece written by Barbara M. Angelillo (director of Inclusive Communities) and Alan Potash (director of the Plains States Region Anti-Defamation League)
  • And here’s press coverage of the latest attempt on the part of the City Council to strip the EEO of it’s power. Gary Gernandt has created an amendment to the EEO that would modify it to only apply to city employees. Obviously this would greatly reduce the impact of the bill, and queer folks working in the private sector (like yours truly!) would still be at risk for discrimination.

Make your voice heard! Visit any of the links above and make phone calls, write emails, leave comments!